Active Posture Shirt Review

Active Posture: Review

Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post but I was gifted the Active Posture 2.0 shirt to try. All thoughts and opinions are my own and this review has not been influenced by the company.


Active Posture Clothing: Review

I was recently contacted by a company called Active Posture – they had read my blog and thought that myself and my readers might benefit from trying their Active Posture 2.0 shirt. Personally, I had never heard of posture clothing but according to their website, posture clothing activates muscle memory, which can help to achieve an improved, upright posture over time.

Initially, I was a little dubious of this for my own personal situation. Because I have had scoliosis surgery, my posture is already “straight”, as in I can’t really slouch, so I was curious as to how this product would benefit me.

However, as I read on I became intrigued. Apparently, the Active Posture shirt has been scientifically proven to reduce pain, improve spinal alignment, increase core activation, and reduce wear and tear on the body. Their website says it activates and stimulates inhibited muscles and decreases tension in over strained muscles, which sounds perfect for those of us with scoliosis.

So I decided to give it a try. As I do a lot of running, I thought it might help support my back as the website says the shirt can be good for helping with posture and minimising risk of injury when training.


First Impressions

The shirt I tried was the Active Posture Shirt 2.0 in blue.

When the shirt arrived I thought it looked really smart. The packaging was really nice and the shirt itself looked and felt like it was very good quality.

Active Posture Shirt
Active Posture Shirt

It’s made from nylon, spandex and polyester and moisture wicking (this means that it draws moisture away from the body), which means it’s perfect to wear when working out.

 


How does it work?

The Posture Shirt features a unique patented NeuroBand technology – this activates and stimulates muscles in the back and shoulder, which can help in improving posture. The Posture Shirt is approved as a medical device in CE class 93/42/EEC as well as by the FDA, guaranteeing that this product is effective, tested and safe to use.


What did I think?

So far, I have worn the shirt when running, during a few exercise classes and when sitting down at home.

When you first put it on, it feels very tight – so it takes a bit of getting used to. However, apparently it needs to be tight for it to work. It’s very important to choose the correct size, and they have a size guide on their website to ensure this.

A positive though was that it really did feel like the shirt supported my lower back when I was running. I do get quite a lot of lower back pain from my scoliosis, and the shirt felt a bit like when I wore my brace after surgery, in the sense that it gave me some good support and it did reduce my pain fairly instantly.

Active Posture Shirt - Back
Active Posture Shirt – Back

To get the full effects, you are supposed to wear the shirt every day which I admit I haven’t done. I have been wearing it sporadically so far but when I have worn it, my lower back definitely feels more supported.

According to the website, the shirts should be worn for 30-60 minutes every day or every other day during the first week.  As your posture gradually changes and your muscles start to respond, you can slowly increase the duration.

I’m going to have a go with wearing it when sitting down at home and also at work (as I sit at a desk all day) to see if it helps and I will write a follow up post with how I get on with this. I really do think if you wear it regularly, if you suffer with scoliosis or any type of back or shoulder pain, that it could benefit in supporting your back and reducing pain as I have noticed results fairly instantly when I have put it on.


Would I recommend the Active Posture shirt?

It’s early days for me and I’d like to use it more regularly but the early signs are positive. I’m going to continue to wear it at home, at work and when working out and I’m very interested in what results this will bring. Apparently, the most noticeable changes will be achieved after it has been worn over a period of approximately 60 to 90 days. I’d never heard of anything like this before but I guess for someone like me, with scoliosis who runs and works out a lot, a product like this is perfect.

If you are interested in giving it a try yourself, they have a 30 days return policy, so you could try it risk free, and if you don’t notice a difference you can send it back and get your money back.

I also have voucher code, if you use louise10 you will get 10% off.

For more information on the product and how it works visit the Active Posture FAQ page. 

Have you ever tried anything like this before? If so what were your experiences? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below.


Disclaimer: Please note if you have severe disabilities, injuries or have recently had surgery, I would recommend checking with your Dr or specialist before using the Active Posture clothing. Also Active Posture recommend children and adolescents under the age of 16 refrain from using posture clothing without consulting their physician or physiotherapist. 

Medsmart App: Review

Wow! I can’t believe that January is almost over, where has this month gone seriously?

So as part of my blog strategy for this year I want to start reviewing and recommending products and services that will benefit those of us with scoliosis and chronic pain. The other day I came across this really useful app called Medsmart, which basically reminds you to take your medications.

Now, I’m really really lucky because at the moment (touch wood) I do not need to take painkillers for my back. I manage my pain through regular exercise and only really take painkillers now and again. However, when I saw the app, I thought that some of my readers may benefit, especially if you take quite a few different painkillers for your back.

The app is free on Android and Apple and once you download and register you are greeted with your medicine cabinet (shown below)..

Medsmart

 

 

It lets you add your conditions, scan in your medicines and set reminders for when you take them. It’s really easy to use and I think if you take several medications it would be really useful. You can also set up multiple profiles and medicine cabinets which would be useful for families for example.

Anyway, just thought the app looked good and might be useful to my readers so if you are interested in trying it out, it can be downloaded for free below:

Medsmart Meds & Pill Reminder

 


Have you tried Medsmart or any other medication trackers? What did you think? What can you recommend? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

Louise X

 

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Pilates for Scoliosis - Curves Twists and Bends

Pilates for Scoliosis: Review of Curves, Twists and Bends

This post contains affiliate links

I recently purchased the above book from Amazon “Curves, Twists and Bends: A Practical Guide to Pilates with Scoliosis” and thought I’d share my honest opinion.

Pilates is something I’ve always wanted to get into, as I know it’s important for me to have a strong core. I have been to the odd Pilates class over the years but I’ve always left feeling underwhelmed.

The issues I’ve had with Pilates classes are:

  • Some Pilates exercises I can’t do due to my fused spine.
  • The classes have been too big for one-on-one guidance.
  • I’ve  worried about doing the exercises incorrectly due to my scoliosis.
  • I’ve felt embarrassed being singled out due to my “condition.”

This year however, I really want to focus on strengthening my core muscles and maybe giving Pilates a chance. I feel like this is especially important because I am starting to get into running again.  They do have Pilates classes at my gym but I don’t fancy going for the above reasons. Also, I feel like I need to be taught by someone who has experience in teaching people with scoliosis to truly benefit.

So…I had a bit of a look online and came across this Pilates for scoliosis book on Amazon and thought I’d give it a try.


What I like about this book..

  • It’s written by Annette Wellings, who suffers from major scoliosis herself and is a trained Pilates instructor. This reassures me that she understands scoliosis and that the exercises are tailored to help scoliosis.
  • It explains very clearly and in detail the causes of scoliosis pain, and provides specific exercises to target specific “bossy” and “underdeveloped” muscles that develop as a result of scoliosis. I found this part of the book really interesting as it helped me to understand why I get the pain I do.
  • The exercises are categorised into 7 categories:
    • The basic top 10.
    • Stretches.
    • De-rotation exercises.
    • Lengthening exercises.
    • Letting go of the bossy muscle.
    • Teaching the weak side to talk.
    • Pelvic Stability.

This is useful because you can choose the exercises that suit your particular situation (see below).

Pilates for Scoliosis - Exercises
Pilates for Scoliosis – Exercises
  • The book features easy to follow “stick person diagrams” to illustrate how to do each exercise (shown below).
Pilates for Scoliosis- Exercise Example
Example of the exercise illustration
  • Most exercises can be performed whether you have had scoliosis surgery or not. The ones that may be difficult for those who have had scoliosis surgery are specified.
  • There are so few reliable resources out there on Pilates for scoliosis, that it’s a breath of fresh air to actually have a book with Pilates exercises tailored for scoliosis.

What I wasn’t so sure about..

  • As the book is aimed at the general reader, there is quite a lot of information at the beginning of the book about scoliosis. For example, what it is, types and causes. I didn’t really find this useful as I already knew most of it and just wanted to get into the exercises.
  • Some of the exercises aren’t relevant to people that have had scoliosis surgery (although it does state).
  • While the stick diagrams are good, it may have been clearer to supplement some of the exercises with pictures/photographs of someone performing them.
  • Towards the end of the book there’s a chapter called “Strategies for Living with Scoliosis.” Again, while some parts of it could be useful for someone who hasn’t had surgery (e.g. clothing advice), I thought this wasn’t really that relevant if you’ve had surgery to correct scoliosis, or you’ve been living with scoliosis for a long time. On the other hand, if you’ve been recently diagnosed with scoliosis, this information would probably be very useful.

Overall..

For me, there was a lot of information in this book that I already knew and wasn’t really relevant. I think if you’ve had scoliosis for a while you’ll probably already know about it and how to cope with the condition. However, the section explaining the psychology of scoliosis and understanding scoliosis pain was really interesting.

There aren’t many reliable resources out there for Pilates for scoliosis – especially for people who have had the surgery. Therefore, the exercises in the book will be useful for anyone with scoliosis, whether you’ve had surgery or not.

They are gentle, low impact exercises and stretches designed to improve muscle strength and reduce the pain and muscle tightness associated with scoliosis.

It has good reviews on Amazon and is pretty good value so I would definitely recommend if you are looking for some safe Pilates exercises to help with scoliosis.

I think this book would be of particular use to those who have recently been diagnosed and want to learn more about the condition and ways to manage pain.



Related Posts

My Favourite Scoliosis Exercises


Disclaimers:

This article is not intended to substitute for informed medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or condition. Always check with your doctor before changing or starting a new fitness routine.

The exercises listed in this article are intended to be helpful for those who have either not had scoliosis surgery or who have fully recovered. They will not be suitable for everyone with scoliosis. I accept no responsibility or liability for any injuries caused directly or indirectly through the performing of the exercises described. If you feel any discomfort or pain during any exercise, stop immediately.

If you have recently had scoliosis surgery, speak to your Dr/physiotherapist in order to get tailored exercises for you while you recover. You will need to be very careful and it will probably be difficult to do anything other than walking and simple exercises for a while. (Remember NO bending, lifting or twisting for at least 6 months following scoliosis surgery).

Fitbit quote

I heart my Fitbit <3

This post contains affiliate links

It’s a known fact that sitting down all day is bad for us and this especially true for those of us with scoliosis  – personally I find that my back hurts a lot more and feels much stiffer if I don’t move around regularly. Walking is a fantastic way for most people with scoliosis to stay in shape as it doesn’t put too much pressure on the back and over time it can help to keep the back and core strong, which can help to protect the discs in lumbar spine and reduce pain. This is vital if, like me, you have had spinal fusion, as staying fit and strong can help to prevent disc wear and tear below the fusion. Walking can even help with losing weight, which inadvertently may help to reduce back pain over time by reducing the amount of pressure on the spine.

Now, I have always considered myself pretty active and it is because of my scoliosis that I try to go to the gym 3-4 times a week, but the problem is that (like a lot of people) I drive to work and then I work in an office and so I’m sat down for the majority of the day Monday – Friday, which does not help my back or core muscles at all.

So, in a bid to move more, in January this year I bought myself a Fitbit Charge HR. The reason I bought the HR version initially was not to purely monitor my steps, but to also monitor my heart rate at the gym, as I wanted to make sure my heart rate was in the right “zone” for working out and I wanted to know how far I could safely push myself to get fitter. The HR version also monitors your sleep which is pretty cool.

As soon as I started using it though, I got addicted to counting my steps and it came as a bit of a shock to see how few steps I actually did in a day. I knew that sitting down all day in an office was bad for my back and that I did most of my activity after work, but having my Fitbit really highlighted how bleak my average daily step count was.

With the Fitbit you can set yourself a step goal for each day, and the recommended number of steps is 10,000 per day (about 5 miles). What became quickly apparent, was that in an average work day, I was struggling to even reach 3,000 steps, plus I had long periods of time throughout the day where I was inactive.

I find that having my Fitbit on really does encourage me to get up and move around more often at work, even if it’s just to go and make a cup of tea or walk the longer way back to my desk. I now make sure that I go for a 30 minute walk everyday at lunchtime and I go to the gym after work everyday if I can. I find that if I can do these two things, I usually meet my 10,000 a day step goal quite easily in the week and I can often get up to 15K steps on a “gym day” depending on what I do (the Fitbit doesn’t record steps for things like indoor cycling or spin classes).

What’s worrying though, is that in an average work week, if I DON’T go for a walk at lunchtime or go to the gym I will get around 2-3K steps in a day, which I think is pretty poor. If I go for a 30 minute walk at lunchtime but don’t go to the gym I will get around 6K steps, which is better but still a far cry from the recommended 10K. This is worrying because the majority of office workers will be in the same boat and probably getting around 3-4K steps a day, which is not even half of what they should be getting. I think it highlights that, for people with sedentary jobs like myself, you really do have to make a conscious effort to fit exercise into your daily routine.

I’ll be honest, having my pitiful step count on my wrist and on the app (especially when compared to my friends who have more active jobs) really does push me to go for a walk everyday at lunchtime, or head out for a walk/run at the weekends, even if it’s cold or raining! Whereas pre-Fitbit, on an average workday I would have happily worked through lunch or just sat at my desk, in my car or in the kitchen at work to eat my lunch, which would not have done anything to help me or my back.

I do find that getting 10,000 steps is much easier for me at the weekends, I usually find that a 90 minute walk does the job nicely and this can be fitted in fairly easily. What’s interesting though, is how many steps I do when I’m out shopping at the weekend, out for the day, or away on holiday – for example, it’s not unusual for me to do up to 25,000 steps a day when I’m out shopping, which goes to show how bad office work can be (I now use it as an excuse to go shopping at the weekends!)

Another good thing about the Fitbit, is the fantastic app which features a dashboard of your daily stats and some challenges (workweek hustle, weekend warrior and goal day), so you can basically compete with friends to get the most steps in a day, work week or weekend. I must admit this really brings out my competitive side and I have often found myself walking/running up and down the corridor of my flat or running furiously on the treadmill at the gym to get more steps and win the challenges (or just not come last)!! Plus, competing with friends and earning the various Fitbit trophies and badges that are on offer also helps with keeping motivated.

I would go as far to say that my Fitbit has been once of the best things I’ve bought this year, it’s changed my life and sadly I think I would find it difficult to live without it now, or particularly to exercise without it – I feel a bit lost if I’m not wearing it and I hate having to take it off to charge it.

Fitbit quote

If you are into running, it’s also fantastic for that as the HR Fitbit also monitors your heart rate and can be used in conjunction with apps like Runkeeper.

Fitbit dashboard
Fitbit dashboard

If you don’t fancy splashing out on a Fitbit there are also plenty of free apps out there that count your steps. The health apps that come free with most smartphones now are pretty good and will do the job nicely, for example the iPhone Health app, the only downside is that you need to remember to have your phone on you all the time.

There are also Fitbits that will simply track your steps, so if you’re not bothered about the sleep tracking and the heart rate monitor that come with the HR Fitbits, these are an alternative lower cost option. There are of course lots of other fitness trackers out there, my advice would be to do your research and get the one that looks right for you.

Why not give it a go and see just how many steps you do in a day?

You could start by using an app on your phone – it may just surprise you. I guarantee walking more (if you can) will help you to feel fitter and stronger, which may help your back pain over time as you get stronger :-). One word of warning though – getting your daily step goal can become highly addictive!!

If you are new to walking or struggle with walking, even just improving a bit on what you do now each day will help. The Mayo Clinic recommend adding 1000 daily steps each week, so if you start monitoring your steps and find you are doing 4000 steps per day now, simply set your goal at 5000 steps each day. I know increasing my daily steps has helped me and I’m definitely more active and feel fitter now than before I started tracking my steps.

Also, if you’ve recently had scoliosis surgery it’s important to try and move around as much as possible and I think that having a fitness tracker could help with that. I’m not suggesting you try and do 10,000 steps early on in your recovery as that will be far too much at first but it’s important to try and walk a bit each day in the first few months post surgery and make sure you move around the house frequently if you can – whatever feels comfortable for you. I say this because when I was recovering from scoliosis surgery I actually developed Oedema in my leg because I was sat down too much and not moving enough. So it’s important to try and keep moving during recovery, even if it’s just a little bit when you can to limit the chance of developing Oedema or something more serious (such as a blood clot).  You can read more about my recovery from scoliosis surgery here.

P.S In case you are interested, the Fitbit I have is the one below (I have it in purple :)). I bought mine from Argos in the sale but they are cheaper on Amazon at the moment. If you already have a Fitbit and want to challenge me please do contact me and I’ll add you on there :0)

 

 

P.P.S

Get some decent trainers!

It’s important to note just before I go, that whilst walking can be a great, low impact way for me to stay in shape post spinal fusion, it’s also important that I protect the un-fused lower discs in my back (L3 and below, as I’m fused T3-L3) and avoid putting too much strain on them.

As an extra precaution, if I’m walking long distances I usually wear my Skechers memory foam trainers, which I originally bought to do the Cancer Research 26 mile Shine Walk a couple of years back (I now have two pairs!) I love them because they are sooo comfy and the memory foam helps to absorb some of the impact, which I find helps with the lower back pain I sometimes get after walking long distances. Plus, I think that they look great too as there are lots of vibrant colours and designs to choose from. I really can’t recommend memory foam trainers enough if you have scoliosis or suffer from low back pain – I don’t think I could go back to wearing “non-memory foam” trainers now.

You can buy the Skechers memory foam trainers from any Skechers store but they are also available from Amazon and tend to be much cheaper online in general.

Keep on movin’

Louise X

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to substitute for informed medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or condition. Always check with your doctor before changing or starting a new fitness routine.