British 10K London Fundraising for Scoliosis Race Recap

British 10K London: Fundraising for Scoliosis

So, yesterday I achieved one of my objectives for the year and ran the British 10K for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund. How was it? Much tougher than I expected!

Those of you who follow my blog may know that I have done several 10K races this year and ALOT of training to prepare for this event. I have been training since January, as back then I could barely run 5K!

But I was determined to build my distance and take part in this event to help raise money for a charity so close to my heart.


British 10K London: Race recap

I travelled down to London with my boyfriend on Saturday, a day before the race, as I’m based up north and the race started early Sunday morning. When we arrived in London the first thing I noticed was how hot it was compared to up north (!) and I was really hoping it would cool down for the race as I’m not great with running in the heat.

I did my very best to prepare for the race on the Saturday, I refrained from alcohol, drank lots of water and ate a lot of pasta! The refraining from alcohol bit was tough because everyone around me was drinking, as it was such a gorgeous sunny day!

We did some chilling on the Southbank, went for a meal and then had an early night (boring but I really wanted to do well!)


The day of the race

British 10K
British 10K

Even though we were staying in central London, we had to get up pretty early and get the tube across to the start (9.30am).

When we arrived at the bag drop area it was crazy busy (there were over 10,000 participants!) and I started to get nervous. I didn’t sleep well the night before as I was worrying about the race. This was my second race of this scale (I did the Great Manchester Run in May) so I’m still getting used to running these type of events.

We arrived in plenty of time though, so I had time to queue for the toilet and then head over to my start pen (E). I have to say at this point, that considering the scale of this event, I thought it was EXTREMELY well organised. I have taken part in smaller running events which have been utter chaos and so I was very impressed! There were plenty of signs telling us where to go which took a bit of my anxiety away.

To get to our start pens we had to walk down Pall Mall, which, lined with Union Jack flags set us up for the race nicely!

British 10K - walk to the start
British 10K – walk to the start

It was about a 10 minute walk to get to my start pen, which was a good warm up and a chance to take some pics. At this point it was already getting HOT, so I was starting to get concerned about running in it (I’m a northerner so I’m not used to the sun…!)

British 10K - Pall Mall
British 10K – Pall Mall

Once I reached my start pen, they did some warm ups and eventually we made our way to the start. Everyone was put in groups (A-H) depending on their speed, so the fast groups went first and we all gradually filtered round. I was in group E which was pretty much in the middle.

British 10K - at the start
British 10K – at the start

During the race

I have to say I really struggled with this race. I have done several 10K’s this year and I found this one the hardest by far. It was mainly to do with the heat, for me it was just too hot to comfortably run in. It was around 26/27 degrees and very humid and there were no clouds at all so the sun was burning down on us.

I have done a few training runs in hot weather but as we don’t get many really hot days up north I’m used to running in much cooler temperatures. As it was so hot, I didn’t enjoy it as much as I wanted to. I felt like I couldn’t really take in the amazing sights because I was struggling so much to keep myself going!

There were soooo many times where I was tempted to stop but I didn’t. I just keep thinking of the scoliosis charity and all those amazing people who had sponsored me and I didn’t want to let them, or myself down.

So I didn’t stop once, I kept going and all the way round I was just thinking – when will this end?! It was pure torture!! Most of the runners running near me were visibly struggling and there were so many who had to stop and walk.

Despite this though, the route itself was a great route, past all the main sights and there were lots of cheering crowds to keep us going! The highlight was probably running over Westminster bridge, as not only were the views awesome, I knew we were near the end!!

I definitely ran slower than I could have done in parts due to the heat. When I approached the finish line I had literally no energy to sprint like I usually do and just kept at my steady pace.


After the race

I collapsed in a heap!

Not quite… I found a place to sit down and catch my breath and wipe myself down (yuk!) After I recovered, I checked my Strava and it appeared my average pace was similar to that of the Manchester run, so despite the heat I wasn’t going as slowly as I thought!

British 10K at the end
British 10K – with my medal

In the end, I managed to complete it in exactly 1 hour, which is slightly slower than my previous 10K races (PB is 57.27) but not bad considering how I felt.

I was a bit disappointed as I was hoping to get a new PB given all the training I’ve done but I guess the elements were against me.

At the end of the day, I know I can do 10K faster but it’s not about speed. I’m just proud that I finished it, I didn’t stop and that I raised money for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund, which is what I set out to do. When it comes to it, this is all that matters.

I even managed to meet up briefly with some of the other scoliosis runners who are all amazing and inspirational! It was great to meet others with scoliosis as I had actually never met anyone else in “real life” with scoliosis before.

British 10K - Team Scoliosis Campaign Fund
British 10K – Team Scoliosis Campaign Fund

Overall, I had a great day even though the run was tough. Plus, the medal and finishers pack is awesome (yes, that is a tin of baked beans..!)

British 10K - Finishers Pack
British 10K – Finishers Pack

Thank you to everyone who has sponsored me so far, it means so much to me!

My sponsor page will be accepting donations until November, as my next challenge for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund will be trekking the Great Wall of China in October (post coming soon).

If you have scoliosis or know someone with scoliosis please consider sponsoring me to help the Scoliosis Campaign Fund.

The Scoliosis Campaign Fund raises money to support people with scoliosis and their families, and fund research into finding the causes of scoliosis and treatments to improve quality of life for patients. They are only a small charity so every penny really does mean everything.
Make a donation using Virgin Money Giving

Thanks for reading 🙂

Louise X

Things you CAN do with a fused spine

Things you CAN do with a fused spine!

Since my scoliosis surgery almost 7 years ago, I have achieved SO many things that I never thought would be possible post surgery.  As scoliosis is in the news right now (as a result of Britain’s Got Talent) and in some cases being portrayed rather negatively, I thought I would try and put a positive spin on things.

I wanted to share my achievements post scoliosis surgery to prove that there IS life after scoliosis surgery! Once recovered, your scoliosis shouldn’t stop you from living a normal life.

Disclaimer: Please note, these are all things I have achieved once fully recovered (e.g after at least 1 year post op). Every case of scoliosis is different. I’m aware that not everyone is as lucky to be able to do all these things post surgery. If you have recently had spinal fusion, please do NOT try any of the below until you have had the all-clear from your Dr/surgeon. 


Things you CAN do with a fused spine…

Yes, living with scoliosis and a fused spine can be difficult at times. There are things you probably shouldn’t do or activities that need to be adapted post surgery. Sometimes though, it’s easy to ignore all the amazing things you CAN do after such a major life changing surgery.

I have blogged about most of these things already, but thought I’d list them all in one post and keep adding to it as I achieve more things!

  1. Climb a mountain
  2. Run 5K, 10K races
  3. Complete a muddy obstacle course
  4. Walk 26.2 miles overnight for charity
  5. Complete a MSc Degree with distinction (while working full time)
  6. Go to the gym 4/5 times a week
  7. Body Pump and light weight lifting
  8. Zumba/Aerobics
  9. Dance
  10. HIIT (high intensity interval training) classes such as Metafit
  11. Boxercise
  12. Body Combat classes
  13. Cycling / Spin classes
  14. Swimming
  15. Hike up hills
  16. Ride a Zip wire
  17. Travel all over the world
  18. Snorkel

What else?

ANYTHING you put your mind to!

Scoliosis Quote - Broken Crayons still Colour

My surgeon honestly told me there was nothing I couldn’t do after I had all restrictions lifted. (This was after about a year post op.) He even told me I could ride roller coasters and go bungee jumping (I’ll add it to my list…).

I know every case is different and I’m not saying you SHOULD do any of the above things if you have had spinal fusion. Lower impact exercise is much better for the spine than say running.

However, these are just some of the things I have achieved since surgery that I’m proud of.

I never thought I’d EVER be able to do any of the above things when I was in the early stages of recovery. But our bodies are amazing things and I believe we can do anything we put our minds to. 


What’s next?

My ultimate goal is to run the London Marathon for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund because, wow, what an achievement that would be!

The Scoliosis Campaign Fund had a team running the London Marathon this year and several team members had had scoliosis surgery. I just found that so inspiring and would love to do the same in the future.

I think surviving this surgery has really made me determined to keep pushing myself to try and achieve more things. I just want to squeeze as much out of life as possible and do as much as I can/try new things. When I first had the surgery, I was scared of causing damage to the fusion but now I am more daring.

There are so many more things I want to do, so hopefully I can keep growing this list over time 🙂


Have you had scoliosis surgery? What have you accomplished that you thought would never be possible post surgery?

Please share your stories below in the comments, I would love to hear from you!

Louise X

parkrun

Park Run Delamere Forest…a new PB!!

I’m so happy right now!

I just came home from my second Park Run at Delamere Forest and I managed to get a new PB!

Back in January, I went to my first ever Park Run at Delamere Forest. It was cold, dark, raining and generally bad conditions for running.

Despite this though, I still managed to get a time of 33 minutes and I was so proud of myself.

I haven’t managed to get back to Park Run since January as life has kind of got in the way. I was determined to go this weekend though as I’m conscious that my 10K London race for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund is coming up and Park Run is great training for that. Plus, it was a lovely sunny morning and perfect conditions for running.

This time, I was much more organised as I knew the drill. I arrived 10 minutes before the start time of 9am and made sure I was wearing my heart rate monitor and that my Runkeeper app was ready to go. I also made sure I had my headphones on ready so I could listen to my music and Runkeeper progress. Last time I didn’t get myself sorted in time and so had no music to listen to!

This time there were also A LOT more runners there, I think because it was such a sunny day compared to last time.

Park Run

I also wore better trainers this time. Last time I wore my gym trainers and they pretty much got ruined as it was sooo wet and muddy. I also nearly slipped on the mud last time and nearly twisted my ankle a few times too as it’s quite rocky underfoot and there are tree roots and things sticking out.  After my first Park Run, I bought some Karrimor trail runner trainers which are much better for the off-road conditions, like those at Delamere Forest.

park run

It was the first time I wore these trainers but I have to say I was impressed. They weren’t particularly expensive but the grip made such a difference. They are also waterproof too so if I do go on a wet day again in future, I don’t need to worry. The other thing I did was purchase a Park Run card. This is basically just a card with your name, phone number and barcode on the back. It just makes it easier as if you pop it in your purse you never have to worry about forgetting your barcode in future. I got one because on the first Park Run it was so wet that my paper barcode wouldn’t scan properly which caused a bit of delay at the finish line. So all in all, I felt like this time everything went much more smoothly!

A new PB

Last time my time was 33 minutes and 27 seconds. For me, this was a HUGE achievement! I didn’t even know if I’d be able to run the full 5K let alone finish at a decent time. This time last year, it took my around 40 minutes to run 5K, so I’ve improved so much. Today, I did push myself. I knew I wanted to beat my last time, the conditions were better this time and I was better prepared.

Today, I managed to get a time of 31 minutes!

I’m so pleased with this, although it wasn’t easy. Especially the last hill at the end! I did push myself quite a bit and I’m slightly worried how I will manage to do my 10K race as I was completely knackered after running 5K at this pace… I’m going to keep going though and will hopefully find it easier over time and keep improving. The best thing is that, even though it was a struggle, my back felt great! It may have been down to the adrenaline, or maybe the trainers I’m not sure but my back didn’t hurt one bit. I have been working on strengthening my back over the last 9 months so I feel like this is really paying off. Although, of course I have good and bad days and it will probably start hurting tomorrow!

#LoveParkRun

Overall, I think I run much better in a group like Park Run than when I run by myself. I think it’s because my competitive side comes out and I push myself more. It’s a fantastic, friendly atmosphere and I really can’t recommend it enough. I feel on a high all day 🙂

Have you ever been to Park Run? Tell me about your experiences in the comments below!

Until next time!

Louise X

Park Run

British London 10K Run - Westminster

British 10k London Run

I’m so excited!

This week it was confirmed that I have a place in the British 10K London run on 9th July and I’ll be running to raise money for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund.

The British 10K London run takes runners through some of  London’s most iconic sites, such as Trafalgar Square, the Embankment, Big Ben and more.

The Scoliosis Campaign Fund raises money to support people with scoliosis and their families, and fund research into finding the causes of scoliosis and treatments to improve quality of life for patients. There is more information on the great work the Scoliosis Campaign Fund do in this useful information sheet.

Raising money for scoliosis…

I’ve been wanting to do something to raise awareness of scoliosis and raise money for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund for absolutely ages, I just wasn’t sure what to do. When I saw an article in BackBone magazine about the British 10K London run last year, it inspired me to get involved and I knew that 2017 had to be the year.

It would be my ultimate dream to run the London Marathon for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund, but I am nowhere near ready in terms of fitness and honestly, I don’t think my back could take it.

At the moment, I can just about run 5K and will need to train over the coming weeks in order to work myself up to 10K, so I’m ready for the event.

Scoliosis Campaign Fund T Shirt
Scoliosis Campaign Fund T Shirt

10K Training

As part of my training, I plan to follow a 10K training plan online, whilst also attending any Park Run I can and doing my usual spin classes and Body Pump classes at the gym. Over the past few weeks, I have been running (or jogging!) about 20-30minutes several times a week, as I am also doing the Great Manchester Run in May.

I do find running difficult at times with my back but I am determined to do this in order to raise money and awareness of scoliosis, especially as I never thought I’d ever be able to do anything like this following my scoliosis surgery.

A personal achievement

After my scoliosis surgery, I had to learn to walk all over again. I couldn’t bathe or dress myself and had to have help just getting out of bed. Running a 10K race for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund shows how far I’ve come and I will continue to keep pushing and challenging myself further to achieve my goals.

The British 10k London Run is a major fundraising event for the Scoliosis Campaign Fun and I’m really excited to be involved! I plan on posting regular updates on here with my progress and how I’m getting on with my training.

If you’d like to sponsor me and help to support the fantastic work of the Scoliosis Campaign Fund, you can do so by clicking the button below 🙂

Sponsor me on Virgin Money Giving

Thank you!

Louise X

P.s. if you’d also like to get involved in raising money for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund, there are loads of great fundraising ideas, resources and events you could get involved with available here – Scoliosis Campaign Fund – Fundraising Ideas.

Pin it and help me spread the word!

British 10k London Run - Support the Scoliosis Campaign Fund

My First Park Run

My First Park Run: Delamere Forest

I’ve been meaning to go to a Park Run for the last 6 months (since I registered last year). I’ve been putting it off though, mainly because I was worried that I wouldn’t be able to run the full 5K without stopping.

I got into running about two years ago now, when a friend invited me to run a 10K Race for Life for Cancer Research. That was my first ever organised race and I had about 5 weeks to train (from never having done any running in my life)!! I managed to do it in about 1 hour 17 minutes though and was pretty chuffed with myself.


Running with scoliosis…

After this, I got the running bug and continued to run in my spare time and at the gym. Unfortunately though, I injured my shoulder shortly after this and had to take a break from running for a while. I attended physio and was told my injury was due to my scoliosis. As scoliosis is a side-ways curvature of the spine, and mine is pretty severe, one side of my back has muscles that are more developed than the other side. The more developed side has to over-compensate for the weaker side, which means I am more vulnerable to pain and injuries.

Due to the pain, I decided to stop running for a while and focused on getting my back and shoulders stronger. I started going to Body Pump classes to improve my strength and spin classes to improve my fitness while I wasn’t running. I got a bit impatient though and signed up to a 5K mud run last year. I found the running part very tough though and had to stop a few times on the way round.


New Year, new running goals…

This year, after 6 months of body pump classes, I felt like my back was finally ready to cope with running again. So as part of my New Year Resolutions, I decided to try and get back into running. Earlier this month, I signed up to a couple of 10K races later in the year for motivation and vowed to finally make it to a Park Run.

Park Run Quote Scoliosis


The moment of truth…

The day I chose (Saturday 28th January) wasn’t exactly the best weather wise. It was freezing and chucking it down with rain. Nevertheless, I dragged myself and my boyfriend out of bed at 7am, determined to do it.

When we arrived at Delamere, I was a bit nervous. I didn’t know what to expect or whether I’d be able to make it round without stopping. I’ve ran/jogged 5K on the treadmill a few times recently but there’s a difference from being on a treadmill to being outside in the freezing cold rain and mud.

I needn’t have worried though.

As soon as we arrived I was put at ease. As we all gathered by the start line, one of the friendly volunteers asked if there was anyone there who hadn’t done it before and explained everything to us. We basically just had to run/jog/walk round and at the end they scanned our bar code and gave us our time. It wasn’t a race and there were people there of all abilities and ages (even dogs!)

I was totally unorganised in the excitement of it all and forgot to turn my RunKeeper app on until about 0.5Km of the way round. I also couldn’t get my headphones on quick enough as the run started, so I had to run with no music, which I’m not used to!

In the end though, I thoroughly enjoyed it. The weather was bad which made the track very wet and slippy but despite this, I managed to RUN THE WHOLE 5K WITHOUT STOPPING!!

Not only that, my time was pretty good (for me!) at 33 minutes. This to me is a HUGE achievement and I cannot tell you how proud I am of myself for doing it and finishing at this time. To be honest, I didn’t care about the time I just wanted to get round without stopping.

There were 280 runners and I wasn’t last! Woohoo!


Park Run Results Delamere
My Park Run Results

I have ran 5K before but a year ago it would take me around 40 minutes, so I have really improved. Plus, I think if the weather and conditions were better I may have been able to get round even quicker. We also started at the back (as we didn’t know what to expect) which made it harder to get past people at the start.

I really think the Body Pump and spin classes have improved my fitness and running capabilities. This was the first run in a long time where it actually felt comfortable, easy-ish and I actually enjoyed myself. I love the endorphins I get after a good run and felt on a high for a good few hours after I finished. I think it was endorphins that kept me going in the end.

Delamere is a lovely venue for Park Run and I really enjoyed the scenery of the forest and lake (even if it was ridiculously muddy!) There were also a few hills thrown in! The volunteers and other runners were all really friendly too and it’s like a lovely community. I especially loved how some runners who had finished quickly stayed and cheered the rest of us on.

I NEVER EVER thought that I’d be able to run 5K after I had my scoliosis surgery 6 years ago. However, I have continued to train and push myself and continue to improve as the years go on. It’s an amazing feeling!

I would highly recommend Park Run to anyone. It’s free and really well organised with loads of friendly people. I am definitely planning on going regularly so that I can keep on improving! I’ll also try and take more pictures next time.

ParkRun


Pretty Muddy

Pretty Muddy!

I love a good challenge and continue to push myself following my scoliosis surgery. So, earlier this year, despite injuring my shoulder running last August, I decided to sign up to Pretty Muddy – a 5K muddy obstacle course – to raise money for Cancer Research UK.

I was a bit nervous and worried that I wouldn’t be flexible enough to do all of the obstacles, especially as I knew that some involved crawling under nets through the mud. However, I was determined to give it a good go and religiously followed the training plan on the Race for Life website for 12 weeks before the event.

It was a few weeks ago now, but I successfully completed the race AND, best of all, I managed to do ALL of the obstacles.

Yes, it was a fun run and most people weren’t taking it seriously (there were women of all abilities and fitness levels taking part) but I was extremely proud of myself, as I never thought I’d be able to do ANYTHING like this post scoliosis surgery.

These type of events have previously filled me with fear and I certainly wouldn’t have been able to do it just a few years ago!

Thankfully, I have noticed in the last couple of years that my flexibility has improved immensely, whether this is down to all the gym work I do or whether it’s because my surgery was 6 years ago now I’m not sure but I think it’s this improvement in flexibility that enabled me to complete this obstacle course.

It continues to amaze me what I can do with my fused spine and it just goes to show my scoliosis shouldn’t stop me from trying new things and pushing my limits. Not only did I raise hundreds of pounds for Cancer Research, I also achieved a new personal goal.

I’m not going to lie, my lower back was sore for a day or two afterwards, which was likely because of all the bending and stretching to get over and under obstacles, but luckily this was temporary and overall it was great fun!

I definitely would do it (or another mud run type event) again 🙂

Louise X

  • Pretty Muddy!
Race for Life Medal

Race for Life!

This weekend I did something I thought would never be possible following my scoliosis surgery. I ran 10K (!) through Delamere Forest for Race for Life to raise money for Cancer Research UK. 

I’m not going to lie, the training was hard for me. Especially as I only signed up 5 weeks before the event and so had limited time to train (plus I had never really ‘done’ running before!).

I always thought running and scoliosis didn’t really go together and have always found running difficult. But in 5 weeks I managed to build myself up to complete the race in 1 hr 17 minutes, which I’m so proud of. Now I feel fitter and stronger than ever and hope to improve my running and fitness in time and build up to a quicker time.

After surgery I had to learn how to walk again, so after all I’ve been through with my back I’m really not bothered about being the fastest. I’m just grateful that I can be IN a race at all.

It just goes to show that even after scoliosis surgery I can do anything I put my mind to and I’m so proud of myself.

Now I’m more determined than ever, if you tell me I can’t, I’ll prove to you I CAN 😉

IMG_0171


Louise xx

Shine Night Walk

#ShineWalk for Cancer Research

On Saturday 27th September, I walked a full marathon (over night) along with 17,000 others to raise money for Cancer Research UK.
Overall it was 26.2 miles and I walked for 10 hours straight from 9pm – 7am!

It was the first time I’d ever done the Shine Walk and it was tough. To be honest I didn’t realise how hard it would be, I had been following a training plan and doing lots of long walks for the past 6 weeks and I consider myself relatively fit and active. However, I think as it was at night when my body is used to being asleep, which made it feel much harder and it was a bit of a shock to the system!

Walking for 10 hours straight takes it’s toll on your body and after a while the pain started to set in, my legs felt heavy and painful and my feet started to burn with pain.

Shine Walk Foot Rash
Shine Walk – Foot Rash 🙁

I also nearly collapsed after the event whilst waiting for a taxi due to sheer exhaustion and low blood sugar. The funny thing was though, through it all, my back didn’t hurt once!

The cheering, clapping volunteers and passers-by kept us going throughout and without them I’m not sure I could have carried on, not to mention the copious amounts of chocolate, snacks and refreshments en-route!

Shine Walk

The pain we went through that night though is nothing compared to those battling cancer and this is what I had to remember as I continued on through the pain, as well as over the next couple of days when I could barely walk!

The whole event raised 5 million pounds for Cancer Research and I’m so proud that I was part of it and proud of myself that I managed to walk for that distance, considering 4 years ago I could barely walk following my scoliosis surgery.

It shows how far I have come, and what is possible.



I hope to work myself up to actually running a marathon one day to support the Scoliosis Association and of course I’ll always continue to support Cancer Research UK and all their amazing work.

If you fancy sponsoring me for the Shine Walk event you can still do so here: https://www.justgiving.com/LouiseLaurie/ 🙂

Bye for now!

Louise x

At the top of snowdon

1 year 8 months post op – You can’t see the view if you don’t climb the mountain…

You can’t see the view if you don’t climb the mountain…

In the early stages of my recovery from scoliosis surgery, this was one of my favourite quotes.
It was a quote that really helped me get through the really tough days as it made me realise that one day, I would look back and realise how far I’d come and how strong I was.

Well this weekend I actually climbed a mountain, Mount Snowdon that is, the highest mountain in Wales at 3560 ft above sea level!

I went with some people from work and at first I wasn’t sure if I should go, because of my back as I thought it would be too hard for me but thought it would be a good challenge and didn’t want to let me back stop me.
When we got there I realised it wouldn’t be easy as there were huuge rocks to clamber over, massive steps, rough terrain and very steep climbs. It wasn’t a walk in the park!
When we got about half way up there were also bits I actually had to physically scramble up by using my hands – which is not easy when you can’t bend but amazingly I managed and I got ALL THE WAY TO THE TOP!!!
There were some members of our group that didn’t even make it up so I was really proud of myself and happy that I managed it.
It felt like such a huge achievement to climb a mountain after all I’ve been through with my back and it’s proof at how far you can come after this surgery if you really put your mind to it.
 I’ve been going to the gym a lot and I found the climb relatively easy fitness wise, which I’m also really proud of.
 The only thing I didn’t like was that the rocks were really slippy, there were some very steep drops and loose rocks and I was soo scared of slipping – this was much worse coming down.
There is a train that goes up and down and I think if I did it again I’d get the train down as I think it’s too dangerous walking/climbing down.
My back started hurting as I reached the summit but felt ok after a well deserved sit down in the cafe at the top! Bearing in mind we’d been walking/climbing 3 hours uphill and 3 hours down I think my back coped pretty well overall.

Now I’m in pain from doing it but amazingly it’s not my back but my legs that are killing me today! 

It just goes to show that if you keep going and stay positive, even if it doesn’t feel like it in the early stages of recovery, there’s a wonderful view from the top! (As long as it’s not foggy…)

Snowdon