Your Scoliosis Stories... Mark's Story

Your Scoliosis Stories: Mark’s Story

The next scoliosis story comes from Mark, who offers a different perspective. Mark is 62 and had his first scoliosis surgery 30 years ago.


Your Scoliosis Stories: Mark’s Story

30 Years Ago

As a young boy I had a lot of medical problems.  Among them I remember having asthma, anaemia, and a heart murmur.  So at the age of 12, our family doctor suggested a complete physical be done at the University Hospital in Madison.  After a whole day of tests, it was discovered I had idiopathic scoliosis.

From that day on, every doctor had the same prognosis and they didn’t bother to sugar coat it.  I was told I would not be able to do anything physical after my early twenties, so I should study hard and get a job pushing a pencil.   Back then I loved sports and hated school.  Why not just stick a knife in my heart?

Most people will probably stress a little about the anticipated difficulties of growing up, but for someone with scoliosis, it becomes an even scarier endeavour.  I wondered how I would ever manage as a husband, father, homeowner, and provider, when having to struggle with pain and fatigue every day.

For ten years I gave it a good fight by staying as healthy as possible, but at age 32, I couldn’t cope anymore and surrendered to surgery.  They tried to prepare me for what was considered at that time a very complex, risky surgery.

I was told I might come off the table paralysed, and maybe even not live through it.  The surgeon would straighten my spine using foot long rods attached to my vertebrae with hooks, screws, and nuts.  He would then fuse 9 of the vertebrae together into one solid block.

Regaining consciousness after the surgery was even worse than anything I had imagined.  One particular night in the hospital, I was in very rough shape.  It was so bad I was convinced if I were to fall asleep I would not wake up.  It sounds melodramatic now, but back then it had real life merit.

I spent two weeks lying flat on my back, except for the few times they log rolled me onto my side.  When they did that, I usually lost my breath due to pain and the nurse would have to coax me back to breathing again.

Before they sent me home to recover, they put me in a huge, plaster, body cast.  It extended from just under my chin to down over my hips.  There are other stories about my life in that cast, but I am going to fast-forward six months to when they took it off.  This was an extremely tough time, and I really wanted to put it behind me.  No such luck!

The doctor informed me it didn’t work as planned and I would have to go through it again.  I didn’t know it then, but the second surgery was not as painful and it provided an opportunity to remove all the hardware.

About twelve years later, thanks to the internet, I found a very skilled back surgeon practising in New Orleans.  He would do a third surgery to put some finishing touches on my back by removing sections of five ribs.  When my spine was straightened, those ribs had been pushed outward which made sitting in chairs difficult.  The sectioned ribs would then grow back correctly so I could sit with less discomfort.

It has been 30 years since that first back surgery.

It is generally assumed by family and friends that they fixed me, but that’s not how it is.  What they did was keep me from being disabled.  I was informed from the beginning that I would continue to have problems because now the vertebrae that are not fused have additional stress to compensate for those that are fused.  So the pain and fatigue remains, although slightly more manageable.

Scoliosis has made my life a lot harder than it needed to be. The last thing I want to mention is my continued ability to play singles tennis at a fairly high level.  It is my only safe haven in an otherwise crappy hand God has dealt me.

I’ve often jokingly told people my summers consist of just two things: playing tennis, and recuperating from playing tennis.  People wonder how that’s possible with my bad back, they don’t realise the varied movements and range of motion while playing is physical therapy for me.  However, I have to keep myself in good enough condition to handle the demands of the sport.  I know there will be life after tennis, but it can wait.


Thank you Mark for taking the time to share your scoliosis story in such detail. I’m glad that you are still able to play tennis and that this helps you to manage your pain.

It’s interesting to hear stories from those who have had the surgery a long time ago.

As an aside, it’s important to note that scoliosis surgery (and the hardware used) has evolved in 30 years. Nowadays most people are up walking around a few days after surgery and body casts are not required. The instrumentation generally used now is much stronger (titanium) and complications with the hardware/fusion are rarer than they were 30 years ago. This is an example of how far treatment for scoliosis has come in 30 years.

If you’d like to have your own scoliosis story featured on my blog, please follow this link and share your story!

Louise X

Your Scoliosis Stories...

Your Scoliosis Stories: Sadie’s Story

Well, today is the last day of June (can you believe it?) which means the last day of Scoliosis Awareness Month.

To finish off the month, I thought I’d post a couple more of your scoliosis stories that I have received. Please keep them coming and I’ll be sure to feature them on my blog. 🙂

Today’s scoliosis story comes from Sadie, you can read her experiences with scoliosis below…


Your Scoliosis Stories: Sadie’s Story

I just wanted to say thank you.

When was first diagnosed with scoliosis I had no idea what it was, and I found myself searching for answers, until I stumbled across your blog. I found your blog so useful and even now 1 year on I still read your blog.

I was diagnosed with scoliosis when I was 12 years old, I didn’t know what it was and I was afraid.

I spent a year going back and forth to appointments trying to figure out what the best course of action would be.

I had an S shaped curve, 70 degrees thoracic and 57 degrees lumbar.

I was told that my scoliosis was too severe for bracing, and that the only correction I could have was surgery.

The whole thought of surgery terrified me, I had no idea what to expect. However, I knew I needed the surgery, and so my parents and I signed the agreement papers, and that was that !

The surgery and recovery was hard, but I am so glad that I did it. I couldn’t be happier with the results, and I can safely say 1 year later that it was all worth it in the end !

Thank you for taking the time to read my story.

Sadie Rawson xx

You can find out more about Sadie and her experiences with scoliosis on her blog Looking Back – be sure to check her out!


If you’d like to have your own scoliosis story featured on my blog, please follow this link and share your story!

British 10K- Training Diary

London British 10K: 14 Days to go!

On Sunday 9th July, I will be running 10K for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund in the iconic London British 10k! This will involve a flat, fast 10K through London’s most famed sites.

I have also signed up for another challenge for scoliosis after this. In October, I will be taking on a trek of the Great Wall of China. This will involve 9 days of hiking on challenging and uphill terrain (a post on this is coming soon!)

Through these activities, I want to raise money and much needed awareness of scoliosis. But not only that, I want to inspire others who are suffering with the condition and show that having scoliosis doesn’t have to stop you from achieving your dreams.

The Scoliosis Campaign Fund raises money to support people with scoliosis and their families, and fund research into finding the causes of scoliosis and treatments to improve quality of life for patients.

So, with just 14 days to go until my first scoliosis challenge, I thought I’d write a post to share my training over the last few weeks!

Luckily, I have Strava to help keep a record of everything I do so I can remember… 🙂


Sunday 28th May: Great Manchester Run (10K)

Great Manchester Run

I have already written a blog post on the Great Manchester Run so I won’t repeat myself too much! I spent months training for this event, which I wanted to use as a kind of practice for the London British 10K in July. This was my first ever timed 10K race and I had an amazing time. It was tough as it was quite a humid day but the atmosphere was incredible. I managed to finish under 60 minutes too which was a huge achievement for me (and a PB!)

Thursday 1st June: BODYPUMP

BodyPump

After the Great Manchester Run, I had seriously bad DOMs (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness) in my legs and the running also took its toll on my back and shoulders! For this reason, I had a few days off from training.

On the Thursday after, I started feeling ok again and headed to the gym for BodyPump. I love BodyPump and have written a few posts on it before.

For me, BodyPump is a great complement to running as it helps to strengthen all the muscles in the body, which is crucial to prevent injuries,

 

Saturday 3rd June: 7.7Km run

7.7km Run

 

This was the first training run that I did after the Great Manchester Run, almost a week after the event. I was surprised how much this event took it out of me!

I managed a steady 7.7km which took me 45 minutes – even if I did get a bit wet in the rain!

Theatening Clouds on my run

 

Sunday 4th June: 9.2km walk up and down hills

Instead of running again today, I decided on a walk with a friend as it’s important to mix things up.

We walked a part of the Sandstone Trail in Cheshire – Bickerton Hill. I’ve done this walk a few times so it wasn’t too challenging, although there were a few steep climbs and steps. The views across Cheshire are amazing though, so it’s worth it 🙂

Bickerton Hill

 

Tuesday 6th June: 7.3km run

Windy Run

I had Monday as a rest day, then on the Tuesday I went for a run after work. It was a really windy day so I struggled quite a bit and my pace was a bit slower than usual.

 

Thursday 8th June: 7.4km run

7.4k run

Wednesday was a rest day, so I headed out for another run on Thursday evening after work. I managed 7.4km which I was pretty pleased with!

 

Sunday 11th June: Tatton Park 10K

 

My friend asked me to do the Tatton Park 10K with her and, in a moment of madness after the Manchester 10K, I booked it! To be honest, I wasn’t really looking forward to it as the Manchester 10K really took it out of me. But I thought it would be good as a longer training run for the British 10K. It was a horrifically early start for a Sunday too – I had to get up at 6.30am for an 8.30am race start!

Tatton Park 10K

It was a really nice course though through pretty grounds and mostly flat. Tatton Park is a historic estate with 1,000 acres of lavish gardens and a deer park, so the views were lovely, although I was disappointed that I didn’t spot any deer!

I ran the race with my friend, she is much faster than me but wanted to take it easy so ran at my pace. Although I think running with her must have sped me up as I managed to complete this 10K even quicker than the Manchester one. My time was 57.22 – a new PB. Either that or early morning running could be my new thing (I normally run in the evening).

Considering the first 10K I ever did took me 1hr 20 minutes, I was pretty chuffed with this improvement in my time! Actually, scratch that, I was in total shock!

Overall, I was really impressed with this event. It was really well organised and the grounds were awesome, not to mention the friendly marshalls. They have another 10K here in November which I might sign up for when it’s closer.

Tatton Park

Thursday 15th June: 7km Run

After the Tatton Park 10K, I had a few days off from training to let my body recover and headed out for an evening run on the Thursday after the Tatton Park event.

Run 7Km

 

Saturday 17th June: Mount Snowdon!

Mount Snowdon

Now, this was a challenge! I was on holiday in Wales this weekend (glamping!) and we were staying right by Mount Snowdon (the highest mountain in Wales!) So we (stupidly?) decided to trek up (and down!) it while we were there. The weather was a challenge, as it was a hot day, but other than that conditions were pretty good. Clear blue skies = amazing views!

I have actually walked up Snowdon before when I was only 1 year, 8 months post my scoliosis surgery so I kind of knew what to expect. Although on reflection, the first time was much harder because the weather was poor (rainy and misty with it being March) and I was much weaker than I am now, so I struggled much more the first time.

This time, I still struggled with the steep climbs despite all the running I do. However, I found the “scrambling” parts much easier. I think the months of body pump squats and lunges have made me much stronger!

It was about 6 hours of walking overall (3 hours up, 3 hours down) and it gave me a bit of an insight into what the Great Wall of China might be like. It also made me realise that I’m not as fit as I like to think as I am, as I did struggle with some of the steepest parts. I think it’s great training for China though and I might try and fit another training hike up Snowdon in before my China trip.

 

Monday 19th June: 6.4km Run

Evening Run

Anyone that lives in the UK will know we had a bit of a heatwave this week, well a heatwave by UK standards anyway!  So it was still around 28 degrees Celsius when I went out for my evening run, which was a bit hot for me to run in as I’m not used to running in the heat. I still gave it a good go though as I didn’t want to let my training slip!

I managed to do 6.4km, although the heat did affect me and I did struggle to run at my usual pace.

 

 

Wednesday 21st June: 5.5km Run

Sweaty Run

This was another scorcher of a day for the UK and it was another hot evening run, I think it was about 28/29 degrees Celsius when I went out after work. I didn’t really feel like going out tonight as I was too hot and bothered and feeling sluggish from work.

To be honest, I really had to force myself but I still went out as I wanted to keep on top of my training for the British 10K. I struggled in the heat though and kept my pace fairly steady. I was a right sweaty mess after this one I can tell you!

 

Friday 23rd June: BODYPUMP

Body Pump

I decided to take a break from running tonight and go to a BodyPump class at my gym. I try to go to BodyPump once or twice a week usually but have struggled to fit it in over the past few weeks. It felt great to get back to BodyPump tonight as it’s one of my favourite classes.

I love the feeling of getting my body stronger and I really do think that going to BodyPump classes over the past year has contributed to the improvement in my running.

 

Sunday 25th June: Colshaw Hall 10K

So, this morning I was kind of regretting the Friday night Body Pump as I had seriously bad DOMS/muscle pain in my legs from all the squats!  I could hardly walk let alone run 😉

Despite this though,  this morning I took part in the Colshaw Hall 10K in Knustford (my third chip timed race this year and ever). Unlike the Tatton Park 10K, I’ve had this one booked for a fair while and wanted to use it as part of my training for the British 10K.

Overall, I really enjoyed it! It was fairly flat (apart from a killer hill at the 7km mark which I was pre-warned about!!). It took us through some rather plush areas of Cheshire, down the leafy country lanes – we ran past some rather nice big houses and also Jodrell Bank, which was pretty cool.

I decided not to push myself with this one, as I didn’t want to injure myself before the British 10K.

I wasn’t trying for a PB or anything, I just wanted to complete it!  So I took a steady pace and in the end I finished 59.05, which was similar to the Great Manchester Run (59.09) but not as quick as the Tatton Park 10K (57.22). Still, I’m really pleased that I managed to get under an hour and that it didn’t actually feel too bad at all! I have definitely come a long way with my running. Plus, my legs were ok once I got going, tomorrow may be a different story though…!

I was also glad that the mini heatwave we were having in the UK last week finished in time for this event. It was actually perfect running temperature for me, about 15C and cloudy!

Colshaw Hall 10K

The only downside was that I had to run with a full bladder because the queues for the toilets at the start were mahoosive! Note to self: leave earlier next time…

It was worth it for the huge medal though!

Colshaw Hall 10K medal


Please help me to support the Scoliosis Campaign Fund! 🙂

Phew! It’s only writing it all down that I’ve realised how much I’ve actually been doing. No wonder I’m always hungry..

Seriously though, this is pretty much a standard month for me. When I’m not training for a specific event I usually have more of a mix of different gym classes thrown in too. This month though, I’ve been focusing on running and running events in preparation for the British 10K.

After the British 10K, I will most likely tone down the running and focus more on hikes and trekking to prepare for my Great Wall of China challenge in October.


If you’d like to sponsor me for these events and raise money for those affected by scoliosis, I have set up a Virgin Money Giving page for both events below:

Make a donation using Virgin Money Giving

 

Through Virgin Money Giving, donations will be quickly processed and passed to the Scoliosis Campaign Fund.

Virgin Money Giving is a not for profit organisation and will claim gift aid on a charity’s behalf where the donor is eligible for this.

I really appreciate all your support and thank you in advance for any donations.

 

Louise X

Scoliosis Awareness Day 2017: My Scoliosis Story

Scoliosis Awareness Day 2017: My Scoliosis Story

It’s International Scoliosis Awareness day on Saturday and so I thought it would be a good time to share my own scoliosis story.

In July, it will be 7 years since I had my scoliosis surgery.

I was diagnosed with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis back in 2000 when I was 14 years old. My parents had noticed that I had one shoulder higher than the other and took me to the Dr’s to check it out. I had also noticed some other odd things around this time, such as my rib cage digging into chairs when I sat down and my ribs sticking out at the front on one side. At the time, I didn’t realise what it was, or that these things could be connected. When I was diagnosed it was a huge shock. I went from being a normal, healthy teenager to potentially facing serious spinal surgery.

Scoliosis - back before surgery
Scoliosis – my back before surgery

Unfortunately,  when I was diagnosed, I was told that my scoliosis was classed as severe. I had two curves in an “S” shape that were both well over 70 degrees (anything over 50 is considered as severe). At this point, I had finished growing and so it was too late for non-surgical methods such as bracing. They told me that I needed spinal surgery to correct the scoliosis, mainly to stop progression and further problems in the future.  I remember looking at my X-ray on the screen and just bursting into tears – how could this be happening to me?

As I had finished growing and I wasn’t in any pain at this time, we decided on the “watch and wait” treatment option. This was mainly because  I was terrified of the prospect of surgery. It involved yearly appointments with a specialist who took X-rays and basically monitored it to make sure it wasn’t getting worse.

During this time, I tried to get on with life. I went to University and got a degree but it was hard for me to forget about my scoliosis. During this time, I was deeply unhappy and I think to be honest I fell into a depression. I hated how I looked with a passion and did everything I could to hide my back from others. It affected my self confidence and self-esteem big time. I thought about my back 24/7 and was constantly stressed that it would progress and get even worse.

When I was about 21, I started to get severe muscle spasms around my lumbar curve, pins and needles in my upper back and horrendous back pain. I coped like this for a few years and tried everything for the pain (physio, acupuncture, exercises, swimming, Pilates, painkillers – you name it!) but nothing helped. I’ve lost count of the times during these years that I spent crying because of my back and the pain. I didn’t want to go on like that for the rest of my life.

For this reason, I eventually decided to do some research into the surgery. I read A LOT and spoke to people who had been through the surgery and come out the other side. This was invaluable and made me realise that if I did decide on surgery, maybe there would be some light at the end of the tunnel.  After A LOT of stress, turmoil and tears, I eventually got put on the waiting list for the surgery. I had to wait over a year, which was pure hell. I struggled with anxiety big time during this time as I waited for the date to get closer and constantly stressed about whether I was doing the right thing or not.

On 29th July 2010, at age 24, I eventually had my scoliosis corrective surgery. My spine was straightened with two titanium rids and 20 something screws and fused in a straighter position. The surgery itself took 11 hours, I was in hospital for two weeks, off work for about 6 months and it took me around a year to fully recover.

Scoliosis X-rays
Scoliosis x-rays -before and after surgery

 

It was a major operation and recovery was painful and one of the toughest experiences I have ever been through. After the surgery, I had to learn all the basics all over again. I couldn’t even sit up by myself to start with and I had to learn to walk all over again.

My mum took two weeks off work to look after me at home. To start with, I couldn’t do much for myself and I had to have help with everything, including washing and dressing myself. I also had to learn how to adapt to all the metalwork in my spine. It did feel strange at first (like I had a wooden board strapped to my back!) but over time, I got used to it.

I was very lucky that my surgery was a success and I’m so grateful to my surgeon and to the NHS that I was able to have the surgery.

Scoliosis scar after surgery
Scoliosis scar after surgery

Today, 7 years on, I am without a doubt much happier. I am more confident and I don’t worry or stress about my scoliosis anymore – I just get on with my life. Yes, I still get back pain and I have good and bad days when it comes to this. But it is nowhere near as bad as it was before my surgery and it doesn’t stop me from living my life.

I have achieved many amazing things since recovering from my surgery including travelling to wonderful places, completing a Master’s degree with distinction, running races, climbing mountains and much more.

Scoliosis Awareness Day 2017

I am proud of my scoliosis and I wouldn’t change it for the world, as it has made me who I am today – strong and determined and able to appreciate life and all the things I can do.

Scoliosis Awareness Day 2017

Now, 7 years later, I am doing two things that I never thought I’d be able to do post scoliosis surgery in a bid to raise awareness and money for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund.

British London 10K

British London 10K

On July 9th, I am running the British 10K. This will involve a flat, fast 10K through London’s most famed sites.

Great Wall of China 9 Day Trek

Great Wall of China

In October, I will be taking on a massive challenge with a 9 day trek on the Great Wall of China. This will involve 9 days of hiking on challenging and uphill terrain.

Through these activities, I want to raise awareness of scoliosis. But not only that, I want to inspire others who are suffering with the condition and show that having scoliosis doesn’t have to stop you from achieving your dreams.

The Scoliosis Campaign Fund raises money to support people with scoliosis and their families, and fund research into finding the causes of scoliosis and treatments to improve quality of life for patients.

Through Virgin Money Giving, you can sponsor me and donations will be quickly processed and passed to charities. Virgin Money Giving is a not for profit organisation and will claim gift aid on a charity’s behalf where the donor is eligible for this. I really appreciate all your support and thank you for any donations.

Make a donation using Virgin Money Giving

Thanks for reading! 🙂

Share your own scoliosis story on my blog and help me to raise awareness of scoliosis!

Louise X

Scoliosis Awareness Month 2017

Scoliosis Awareness Month 2017

Scoliosis Awareness Month 2017


June is scoliosis awareness month, so to help raise some much needed awareness I have created the below graphic for you to share.

Scoliosis: Know the signs!

Scoliosis is a sideways curvature of the spine affecting 200 million people worldwide. In most cases, scoliosis first presents itself in young teenagers (it is more common in girls).

It’s important to know the signs of scoliosis and to check children’s backs regularly, especially during the ages of 10-15. This is because, between these ages scoliosis can often develop very rapidly, during the teenage growth spurt.

This is what happened to me. I developed scoliosis in early adolescence but it wasn’t spotted until I was 14. By that time it was already very severe meaning that, unfortunately, surgery was the only treatment option for me. You can see my back and X-ray before surgery in the image below.

Early detection is therefore crucial as if scoliosis is spotted early enough, surgery can be avoided.  

If you’d like to find out more about scoliosis, you can read my scoliosis story or visit my information page – what is scoliosis?

Please also feel free to share the below graphic on social media or your own blog to get the word out about scoliosis! 

To share on Pinterest, simply hit the Pin It! button below.


Scoliosis Awareness Month 2017

Share this Image On Your Site

 

 

British 10K Scoliosis

British 10K – 9th July 2017

British 10K – 9th July 2017

It’s getting closer now!

In just under a month’s time, I will be running the British 10K in London to raise money for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund. Eeeek!

After everything that has happened in London recently, I’m excited and proud to be involved in this event. It will be good to come together in a celebration of London and everything British. In light of the recent events, I imagine the atmosphere will be even more incredible and similar to that of the Great Manchester Run.

British London 10K

Why am I running this event?

After being diagnosed with severe scoliosis at 14 and later having scoliosis surgery at age 24, I have always wanted to do something to raise money for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund.

Now, 7 years after my scoliosis surgery, I am doing something that I never thought I’d be able to do. I am running 10K in the British 10K event in a bid to raise awareness of scoliosis and to raise money for the Scoliosis Campaign Fund.

The Scoliosis Campaign Fund raises money to support people with scoliosis and their families. They also fund research into finding the causes of scoliosis and treatments to improve quality of life for patients.


Training

British 10K London

I won’t lie, running doesn’t come naturally to me and training has been hard.

I have been running several times a week since January, in combination with Body Pump and other classes at the gym. I have also been going to Park Run most Saturdays which has helped me loads. I took part in the Great Manchester 10K a couple of weeks ago and I have another couple of 10K events before the British 10K as practice.

I am concerned about over-doing things though.  The Great Manchester 10K really took it out of me. Ever since the Great Manchester run, my shoulder is sore, my lower back is sore and I get stitch every time I run. I also have a disgusting blood blister on my toe!

However, all of this is worth it if I can raise funds and awareness of scoliosis.

There’s not long to go now so if you’d like to support me and the scoliosis campaign fund you can do so by sponsoring me below… I’d be forever grateful!!


Make a donation using Virgin Money Giving

Louise X

Your Scoliosis Stories...

Your Scoliosis Stories: Kacey’s Story

As June is scoliosis awareness month, I thought I’d kick off a feature I’ve been meaning to do for a while: Your Scoliosis Stories!

This is a feature where I invite you, my readers, to share your own scoliosis stories so that we can all help and inspire each other.

Below is the first story in this series, featuring Kacey and her very recent brave experiences with scoliosis surgery.

Kacey is only 3 months post op but it sounds like she is already doing amazingly well!


Your Scoliosis Stories: Kacey’s story

 

I found out I had scoliosis when I was 13 years old.

I’ve sat through numerous x-rays, struggled through many physical therapy classes, and of course dealt with having terrible self confidence.

5 years later, I finally had scoliosis correction surgery.

Only 3 weeks post-op, I have never felt better about myself.

When I started going to the doctor at only 13 years old, my curve was around 30 degrees. I was almost done growing so it wasn’t something that a brace could fix. At that point I was told that it should stop progressing and that it will be something that I was just going to have to live with.

Little did I know that throughout these last 5 years that it had progressed by 15 degrees.

Going into surgery on May 9th 2017 with a 45 degree curve…I was TERRIFIED.

To my surprise, it wasn’t as bad as I thought it was going to be.

It was definitely scary but the 5 days I spent in the hospital flew by and I was home before I knew it. After that, everyday got so much easier.

I grew 2 inches and I have the best battle scar from my scoliosis journey!

Scoliosis Scar - Kacey
Scoliosis Scar – Kacey

Thank you Kacey for sharing your brave and inspiring scoliosis story. What an amazing scar and tattoo also 🙂

I’m hoping to make this a regular thing and would love to feature more of your stories on my blog.

If you would like to feature your own scoliosis story, simply follow this link: Share your story. I’d be so grateful!

Thanks for reading,

Louise X

 

10 facts about scoliosis that may surprise you

10 facts about scoliosis that may surprise you

June is scoliosis awareness month, so to help raise awareness, I thought I’d write a post with some interesting facts about scoliosis.

10 facts about scoliosis that may surprise you

  1. Scoliosis is more common than you think! It is estimated that scoliosis affects 200 million people worldwide. So if you have scoliosis, you are most certainly not alone.
  2. Around eight in 10 people who have scoliosis have idiopathic scoliosis, which has no known cause. This type of scoliosis most commonly develops during the adolescent growth spurt (between the ages of 10-15). Scoliosis is not caused by accidents or from carrying heavy bags, both are common myths.
  3. Most cases of scoliosis are mild and do not require surgical intervention.
  4. Scoliosis is more common in girls than boys. Adolescent girls may be up to 10 times more likely to develop scoliosis than boys.
  5. You can still exercise if you have scoliosis (both before and after scoliosis surgery). In fact, exercise is encouraged as it can help with strengthening the core and back muscles and reducing pain.
  6. Scoliosis can sometimes be hereditary.
  7. Animals can have scoliosis! Scoliosis has been found in fish, cats and dogs amongst others.
  8. Having scoliosis does not mean that you won’t be able to have children – pre or post scoliosis surgery. This is a common myth but in most cases women with scoliosis will have no problems with pregnancy or labour.
  9. There are many celebrities with scoliosis, including Olympic athletes such as Usain Bolt.
  10. Severe scoliosis can affect a person’s appearance due to the twisting and curving of the spine and ribs. This can cause leaning to one side, uneven shoulder blades, one shoulder or hip sticking out, the ribs protruding on one side or the ribs forming a lump on the back.

To find out more about scoliosis, check out my page – what is scoliosis? and please do share this post or the infographic below and help me to raise awareness of scoliosis!

Have you got any interesting facts about scoliosis? Feel free to comment below 🙂

Louise X

Facts about scoliosis

References:

https://www.bupa.co.uk/health-information/directory/s/scoliosis

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/scoliosis/Pages/Introduction.aspx

http://www.sauk.org.uk/downloads/scoliosis-knowthefacts.pdf

http://www.scoliosissos.com/news/post/10-interesting-facts-about-scoliosis

https://www.hss.edu/condition-list_scoliosis.asp